Archive

2008

Dwight Heath (Brown U.)
Dec. 31, 2008
The Globe and Mail
Heath discusses social drinking practices and the affects it can have on how society moderates their alcohol intake
 
Genevieve Bell (Diector of User Experince- Intel)
Dec 29, 2008
CNet.com
Genevieve Bell discusses her observations on TV viewing patterns  as opposed to the use of PC's in daily life.
 
Hugh Gusterson (George Mason U.) & Catherine Lutz (Brown U.)
First 'Minerva' Grants Awarded
Inside Higher Ed
Dec. 29, 2008
Gusterson and Lutz detail concerns about the Pentagon-funded Minerva program.

David Mcmurray (Oregon State University)
USA Today
December 24, 2008
David McMurray talks about the rebirth of the new year.
 
Elizabeth Cashdan (University of Utah)
The Boston Globe
December 22, 2008
Elizabeth Cashdan explains her theory that men prefer female shapes associated with higher or lower doses of male hormones which contribute to their shapes.
 
William E. Davis (Executive Director of AAA)
The Chronicle of Higher Education
December 16, 2008
William (Bill) Davis discusses his future concerns for the AAA in hard economic times, along with several other Executive Directors from other Scholarly Societies
 
Rob Albro, Roberto Gonzoles, Philip Stevens, Brian Selmeski, Kerry Fosher(at AAA Annual Meeting)
USA Today
Nov 9, 2008
Anthropologists discuss the ongoing debate over whether it is appropriate for them to be working alongside soldiers in combat or to contribute in counterterrorism research.
 
Elizabeth Cashdan (U. Utah, Salt Lake)
Fox News.com
Dec, 4, 2008
Cashdan dicusses how the highly desirable "hourglass shape" may not be the mostoptimal in todays cultural and economic climate.
 
Chad Haines (American University in Cairo)
NPR
Nov. 25, 2008
Haines raises concerns over the plight of Gulf migrant workers, and the their uncertain future.
 
Shannon May (U. California, Berkeley)
Ecological Crisis and Eco-Villages in China
CounterPunch
Nov. 21/23, 2008
As one of the "Pulse of the Planet" op-eds, May investigates the failure of a sustainable housing project in rural China to bridge the urban-rural divide.

Brian McKenna (U. Michigan, Dearborn)
How Dow Chemical Defies Homeland Security and Risks Another 9/11
CounterPunch
Nov. 20, 2008
Part of the "Pulse of the Planet" Series, McKenna describes how Dow Chemical has endangered the health, environment, and security of our nation.

Mamood Mamdani (Columbia University)
President-Elect Obama and the Future of US foreign Policy: A Roundtable Discussion
NPR
Nov. 6, 2008
Mamdani took part in a panel to discuss Obama's foreign policy position
 
Yolanda Moses (University of California, Riverside)
Exhibit Organizer Emphasizes Personal Stories
Kalamazoo Gazette
Nov. 5, 2008
Yolanda Moses discusses the Race Project in Kalamazoo, Michigan

Holly M. Barker (U of Washington)
The Inequities of Climate Change and the Small Island Experience
CounterPunch
Nov. 4, 2008
As the next installment of the "Pulse of the Planet Series," Barker highlights the vulnerabilities of small island developing states and the impact of developed nations upon their environment and people.

Gregory Button (U of Tennessee, Knoxville)
What the Next President Must Do to Save FEMA

CounterPunch
October 28, 2008
Button continues the "Pulse of the Planet" series with a look at the circumstances that crippled FEMA's disaster response mission and the steps needed to improve it.

Barbara Rose Johnston (UCSC - Center for Political Ecology)
The Clean, Green Nuclear Machine?
CounterPunch
October 27, 2008
As part of the "Pulse of the Planet" series, Johnston provides insight into whether or not nuclear energy is as clean as the Nuclear Energy Institute makes it out to be.

Mark P. Leone (U of Maryland)
Under Maryland Street, Ties to African Past
New York Times
October 22, 2008
Archaeologist Mark P. Leone discovered in Annapolis, earliest examples of traditional African religious artifacts in North America.

Louise Lamphere (U New Mexico)
Professor Who Sued Brown U Gives It a $1-Million Gift
Chronicle of Higher Education News Blog
October 20, 2008
Lamphere’s gift will establish the Louise Lamphere Visiting Professorship for young faculty to teach in women’s studies and another department. The Brown anthropology department will honor her later this month.

Michael Galaty (Millsaps College)
In Remote Albania, a Centuries-Old Code of Honor Survives
LA Times
September 29, 2008
Local communities struggle to maintain their way of life in the remote Shala Valley of Albania.

Charles Briggs (UC-Berkeley)
Death and Distress on the Orinoco
BBC News
September 29, 2008
The Warao of Venezuela turn to anthropologist Charles Briggs to help identify and tackle an unknown disease that is devastating small communities.

Bill Maurer (UC-Irvine)
UCI Launches New Institute to Study How Poor Use Money
Southern California Public Radio
September 18, 2008
Bill Maurer will act as director of the newly established Institute for Money, Technology and Financial Inclusion to explore how the world's most disadvantaged populations are affected by the mobile banking industry.

Marcia Inhorn (Yale)
What it Means to Be a Woman
Newsweek
September 15, 2008
Marcia Inhorn details both the physical and social consequences that infertility can have for women across the globe.  Treating infertility is difficult in and of itself, but is further complicated when certain cultural hurdles are added to the mix.

Tom Boellstorff (UC-Irvine)
Acclaim and Kudos for Coming of Age in Second Life
Nature
September 4, 2008
Tom Boellstorff's volume is the first book within anthropology to examine the thriving virtual world of Second Life.  His application of ethnographic research methods to understanding the relationships and motivations behind this phemonena has garnered significant praise from Scientific American, Times Higher Education, and Guardian UK.

Melissa Checker (CUNY-Queens C)
Carbon Offsets: More Harm Than Good?
CounterPunch
August 27, 2008
Melissa Checker's article is the most recent installment of Counterpunch's "Pulse of the Planet" op-ed series. Checker highlights the flaws of the carbon offset industry and suggests alternative ways to reduce greenhouse emissions.

John Jackson Jr. (U Pennsylvania)
The Peril of Racial Paranoia
The Philadelphia Inquirer
August 21, 2008
John L Jackson Jr. appeared in the news again, this time highlighting the release of his first non-academic book, Racial Paranoia: The Unintended Consequences of Political Correctness. He describes present-day race relations and how racial fears have come to underlie many of our everyday interactions. Jackson and fellow U Penn anthropologist Deborah A Thomas are also co-chairs of the 2009 annual meeting program.

John Jackson Jr. (U Pennsylvania)
Anthropology: The Softest Social Science?
The Chronicle of Higher Education
July 29, 2008
While economists may dazzle with quantitative calculations, John Jackson defends the value of social anthropology, and qualitative research in general, in shedding light on contemporary issues.

Theresa MacPhail (U California-Berkeley)
Courage Comes with Practice
NPR
July 28, 2008
Medical anthropologist Theresa MacPhail tells a powerful personal story about overcoming fear and learning to practice courage.

Roberto Gonzalez (San Jose State U)
Social Scientists in War Zones
WGBH
July 28, 2008
In the wake of the deaths of two Human Terrain System (HTS) social scientists, Roberto Gonzalez spoke with Boston’s WGBH about his many concerns with the HTS program.

Lisa Knauer (U Mass-Dartmouth)
UMass Dartmouth Professor Plans Study of Mayan Immigrants
SouthCoastToday.com
July 27, 2008
A new study by anthropology professor Lisa Knauer will explore the community of Central Americans living in New Bedford.

Setha Mallios (San Diego State U)
SDSU Archaeology Team Unearthing Long-Buried Whaley House Artifacts
Imperial Valley News
July 27, 2008
The Whaley House in San Diego has been called the most haunted house in the US. This summer, SDSU professor Seth Mallios is excavating the house with a team of students.

William Beeman (U Minnesota)
Success in US Iranian Negotiations Depends on Cultural Knowledge
New American Media
July 24, 2008
A recent watershed meeting between US and Iranian officials revealed a deep cultural divide in negotiation styles. William Beeman offers insight into the cultural context of the talks.

Jane Baxter (DePaul U)
Students Search for 'Old Chicago' in Pullman Neighborhood
Chicago Tribune
July 13, 2008
Digging up remnants of a former Chicago shopping arcade unearths evidence of the glitzy past of the city's Far South Side.

James Adovasio (Mercyhurst C), Robert Kelly (U Wyoming)
Texas Archaeological Dig Challenges Assumptions About First Americans
Scientific American
July 3, 2008
Excavations of the Gault Valley in Central Texas raise questions about the theory that the Americas' first inhabitants, the Clovis people, were highly nomadic

Yolanda Moses, vice provost of diversity and conflict resolution and professor of anthropology at University of California, Riverside, and Michael Blakey, NEH professor of anthropology and director of the Institute for Historical Biology at the College of William and Mary, were featured guests on “The Kathleen Dunn Show” on Wisconsin Public Radio on May 16 for a special program on the RACE: Are We So Different? project. To listen to the interview, click here.

Alejandro Lugo, professor of anthropology and Latina/Latino studies associate at University of Illinois, Champlain-Urbana, contributed a letter to the New York Times in response to the May 4 editorial, “Hard Times at the Golden Door.” In the letter, Lugo highlights the economic displacement caused by U.S. immigration policies and argues for the legalization of the millions of workers who have contributed to a competitive U.S. economy.

Daniel Halperin, senior research scientist and lecturer in international health at Harvard University School of Public Health, was featured in an hour-long call-in show on the BBC for his new research on HIV prevention, which was published last week in the journal Science. To listen to the interview, click here, then select "Listen Tuesday." 

Holly Dunsworth, a postdoctoral research associate in the Department of Anthropolgoy at Pennsylvania State University, read her essay called "I Am Evolution" on NPR's "Weekend Edition" on Sunday, May 11 as part of NPR's "This I Believe" series.  In the essay, Dunsworth examines how her work documenting evolution as a paleoanthropologist has affected her understanding of the phrase, “I believe in evolution.”  

Bonnie Bade, professor anthropology at California State University, San Marcos and Sarah B. Horton of the University of Montana discussed health care for undocumented migrants in California in the recent New York Times article, “Illegal Immigrants Turn to Traditional Healing.”

Indiana Jones: Saving History or Stealing It? 
As the buzz builds surrounding the May release of the new Indiana Jones movie, NPR's "All Things Considered" takes a look at the world's most famous fictional archaeologist from an academic perspective. Winifred Creamer, a professor of anthropology at Northern Illinois Unviersity, offered critical perspective stating, "Indiana Jones walks a fine line between what's an archaeologist and what's a professional looter.” Creamer also offered some insight into the realities of an archaeological dig and shares some comments on the impact of Indiana Jones on her students. 

A Gun in One Hand, A Pen in the Other
Newsweek magazine covered issues surrounding the U.S. military’s Human Terrain System this week with an article profiling several civilian anthropologists employed (or previously employed) in the Pentagon’s $40 million program. AAA president Setha Low responded to the article with the following letter.

The Petition: Israel, Palestine, and a Tenure Battle at Barnard
Atlantic Monthly's Jane Kramer wrote an article on Nadia Abu El-Haj and the events surrounding her controversial bid for tenure at Columbia University. Abu El-Haj came under fire last fall when Columbia University alumna Paula Stern launched an online petition to deny Abu El-Haj tenure based on what Stern claimed to be flawed scholarship and anti-Israeli bias in Abu El-Haj's doctoral dissertation, "Facts on the Ground: Archaeological Practice and Territorial Self-Fashioning in Israeli Society." The Atlantic Monthly article also quotes AAA President-Elect Virginia Dominguez, who served as Abu El-Haj's advisor. Columbia University announced that Abu El-Haj was awarded tenure on November 1, 2007.

U.S. Academic Defends China, Citing Progress
Susan Brownell of University of Missouri was profiled for her research on China’s sports culture and the Beijing Olympics in a recent Wall Street Journal article. In the article, Brownell, formerly a nationally-ranked U.S. track-and-field athlete counters stereotypes of China as an “evil medal machine” and explains China’s sporting tradition of horse racing, wrestling and martial arts. She stated: "When you see the enthusiasm, the idealism and the faith in a better future and then when you look at the perception abroad -- that it's propping up a regime, air pollution, child-athlete factories -- there is a disjuncture." Brownell is the recent author of “Beijing’s Games: What the Olympics Mean to China,” published in February 2008.

Ancient Gold Necklace Discovered in Peru
The National Academy of Science announced in late March the discovery of the oldest gold jewelry made in the Americas. Pieces of the 4,000-year-old gold necklace were discovered in a burial site near Lake Titcaca in Southern Peru. Anthropologist Mark Aldenderfer of University of Arizona described the discovery as “a complete shock” in an Associated Press article. Heather Lechtman of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, who was not involved in the discovery, described the design as “very interesting for such a very early piece of jewelry.”

No Trash Talking at This Museum to the Clean Team
Robin Nagle, a professor at New York University and “anthropologist in residence” at the New York City Sanitation Department, was profiled in the New York Times for ethnographic research on the world of garbage collection. The article describes Nagle’s work developing “Loaded Out: Making a Museum,” a six-week sanitation museum, which she developed with the help of her NYU students. 

Helen Fisher, an anthropologist at Rutgers University was interviewed by NPR for a piece on the tensions between biology and culture for U.S. women who delay motherhood until their thirties and later.

Robert Kemper, professor and chair of anthropology at Southern Methodist University recently contributed to a five-part series on the migration of the indigenous Purepecha people from the rural hill–towns of central Mexico to South Seattle.  The audio of the program and other links are archived at http://www.kuow.org/pvf/pvf_immigration.asp.

Rick Stepp, associate professor of anthropology and Latin American studies at University of Florida, was featured on NPR in a re-airing of “Vanishing and Re-emerging: Reviving Biological and Cultural Diversity,” from a public media project that involved interviews conducted at a major international conference on biocultural diversity held at the American Museum of Natural History in New York in April 2008. 

Kathleen Mossman Vitale was featured in a Vallejo Times-Herald article for her Endangered Threads documentary, “A Century of Color.”  In the article, Vitale discussed some of the challenges of creating a documentary that spans 100 years of history of Mayan weaving. Vitale was also spotlighted as an outstanding woman in film on the Web site, "Women Who Light the Dark.”

Winifred Creamer, a professor of anthropology at Northern Illinois University, offered an anthropological perspective on the famous Hollywood archaeologist Indiana Jones in a recent NPR piece titled, "Indiana Jones: Saving History or Stealing It?" Creamer stated, "Indiana Jones walks a fine line between what's an archaeologist and what's a professional looter.”

Newsweek magazine covered issues surrounding the U.S. military’s Human Terrain System this week with an article profiling several civilian anthropologists employed (or previously employed) in the Pentagon’s $40 million program. AAA president Setha Low responded to the article with the following letter.

Nadia Abu El-Haj was the focus of a recent Atlantic Monthly article about Abu El-Haj's controversial bid for tenure at Columbia University last fall.  The Atlantic Monthly article also quotes AAA President-Elect Virginia Dominguez, who served as Abu El-Haj's advisor.

Susan Brownell of University of Missouri was profiled for her research on China’s sports culture and the Beijing Olympics in a recent Wall Street Journal article. In the article, Brownell, formerly a nationally-ranked U.S. track-and-field athlete counters stereotypes of China as an “evil medal machine” and explains China’s sporting tradition of horse racing, wrestling and martial arts.

The National Academy of Science announced in late March the discovery of the oldest gold jewelry made in the Americas, recently discovered in a burial site near Lake Titcaca in Southern Peru. Anthropologist Mark Aldenderfer of University of Arizona described the discovery as “a complete shock” in an Associated Press articleHeather Lechtman of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, who was not involved in the discovery, described the design as “very interesting for such a very early piece of jewelry.”

Robin Nagle, a professor at New York University and “anthropologist in residence” at the New York City Sanitation Department, was profiled in the New York Times for ethnographic research on the world of garbage collection. The article, "No Trash Talking at This Museum to the Clean Team" describes Nagle’s work developing “Loaded Out: Making a Museum,” a six-week sanitation museum, which she developed with the help of her NYU students. 

Jennifer Jackson, an assistant professor of anthropology at the University of Toronto, brought a linguistic perspective to discussions on Barack Obama's "race and unity" speech by analyzing his oratorical strategies in a recent U.S. News and World Report interview.  < Read more.

Bill Bass, a retired professor of anthropology at University of Tennessee (UT), Knoxville, and founder of the Body Farm research facility at UT, was spotlighted in the Atlanta Journal Constitution for his work with the "Body Farm" novels, a crime series, which Bass and writer Jon Jefferson co-author under the pseudonym Jefferson Bass. The writing team's upcoming book is titled, "The Devil's Bones."  

Nancy Scheper-Hughes, professor of anthropology at UC Berkeley and founding director of Organs Watch, spoke in early February at the first international UN Forum on Trafficking in Humans, where she called attention to the sale and theft of human organs for transplant surgery and the role of transplant surgeons in collaborating with criminal organ trafficking networks. This news story was covered by the Associated Press. < Read More 

Daniel Halperin, senior research scientist at the Harvard School of Public Health, was spotlighted in Time and Newsweek magazines last December for his breakthrough research on male circumcision and HIV transmission. Halperin's research on "male circumcision for HIV prevention," was listed as Time Magazine’s Top Medical Breakthrough of 2007. It was also listed as #15 in Discover magazine’s Top 100 Science Stories of 2007.  < Read More

Ted Bestor, chair of the anthropology department at Harvard University and an executive board member of the AAA, was featured on CBS’s 60 Minutes on January 13 in "The King of Sushi," a segment on the global tuna trade and the crisis of overfishing. < Read More

Robert Leopold, director of the National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution, published a review of Dana Milbank’s recent mock ethnography, “Homo Politicus: The Strange and Barbaric Tribes of the Beltway.” Leopold describes Milbank’s satirical depiction of the Potomac Man as a “cheerfully wicked account.” < Read the review  

Kelly Alley, alumni professor of anthropology at Auburn University worked as the primary consultant and National Science Foundation investigator for “Ganga: A Radio Series,” which aired on National Public Radio’s Weekend Edition on six Sundays in late November and December. Listen to each 14-minute segment by visiting NPR’s Weekend Edition Sunday page and searching the “world” section. More information about the Ganga radio project is available online   

Bennett Bronson, curator at The Field Museum in Chicago, is featured in a Jan. 2 article in the Chicago Tribune about a Chinese scroll watercolor of the Madonna and Child. In the article, Bronson analyzes and conceptualizes the painting, discussing multicultural iconography of the painting, as well as challenges to practicing Christianity which may have contributed to a forged author signature on the painting.