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This paper may be of particular interest to:  Students
Type: Paper
Paper Title: FROM ELEMENTAL CHEMISTRY TO GLOBAL EXCHANGE: INFERRING SOCIAL ECONOMIES AND INTERACTIONS IN BELGIUM, NEW GUINEA, AND THE INDIAN OCEAN-SOUTH CHINA SEA
Author: MARK GOLITKO (Field Museum of Natural History), CHAPURUKHA KUSIMBA (The Field Museum), JOHN TERRELL (The Field Museum), PATRICK WILLIAMS (The Field Museum), RAHUL OKA (University of Notre Dame)   
Date/Time: Thu., 3:45 PM
Co-Author(s): MARK GOLITKO (Field Museum of Natural History), CHAPURUKHA KUSIMBA (The Field Museum), JOHN TERRELL (The Field Museum), PATRICK WILLIAMS (The Field Museum), RAHUL OKA (University of Notre Dame) 
Abstract: Identification of the circulation of ceramics provides a valuable line of evidence for archaeological inference, not only of purely economic transactions, but also social connections along which less materially tangible aspects of culture may have been transmitted in the past. We explore the movement of ceramics at three geographical scales using chemical analysis by Laser Ablation-Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS). On a micro-regional scale, we analyze the temporal distribution of different paste types at sites of the early Neolithic Linienbandkeramik (LBK) culture in the Hesbaye region of Belgium as a means of exploring inter-village alliance structures, ca. 5650-4900 B.C.E. On a regional scale, we examine the production and transport of ceramics along the Sepik Coast of northern New Guinea during the last two millennia as a proxy measure of human interactive and exchange networks, and how these networks relate to the high degree of cultural and linguistic diversity that currently characterize the region. On a global scale, we investigate how agglomerated yet decentralized production of Blue-and-White porcelains in the vast Jingdezhen kilns in China managed to dominate markets in India and East Africa despite competition from other smaller kilns in China and state-sponsored kiln-workshops in Southeast and Southwest Asia and North Africa. We argue that with the combination of archaeological, ethnographic, and historical data, targeted chemical analysis can help archaeologists move beyond establishing provenience and distribution networks to analysis of past interactional behaviors, regardless of period, area, or scale of activity.

Program Number: 2-0840
Session Title: CERAMIC ECOLOGY XXIV: CURRENT RESEARCH ON CERAMICS 2010
Session Sponsor: Archaeology Division
Session Date/Time: Thu., 1:45 PM-5:30 PM
Organizer(s): CHARLES KOLB (National Endowment for the Humanities) 
Chair(s): CHARLES KOLB (National Endowment for the Humanities)  
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