Careers

Anthropologists on the Job Market

At the 2013 AAA Annual Meeting in Chicago, a NAPA-reviewed roundtable session titled Anthropologists on the Job Market: How Departments and Job Seekers Can Respond to the Employment Crisis discussed "current avenues for anthropology Ph.D.s in both the academic and non-academic job search, and consider best practices for anthropology graduate programs to prepare Ph.D. students for successful careers on and off the tenure track." Organized by Karen Kelsky of The Professor Is In, this session "[brought] an ethnographic eye to the choices made by individual job seekers as well as the practices of anthropology graduate training itself... to initiate a disciplinary dialogue about the ethical obligations of graduate programs to their students, and to catalyze greater awareness of the capacity of anthropology Ph.D.s to chart innovative career paths both inside and outside the academy."  

The presenters in this session have shared their presentation materials as a reference for those who were fortunate to attend as well as those who were not present to benefit from this session. Included in these papers and presentations are myriad tips and suggestions for working as an anthropologist in varied employment settings. Our thanks to the presenters for their hard work and generosity.

Karen Kelsky (The Professor Is In)

Dependency, Fear, and Entrepreneurship (with introductory remarks) •PDF

Sarah Kendzior (Al-Jazeera English)

unavailable

Darcy L Hannibal (University of California at Davis)

Applied training for work inside and outside the academy •PowerPointPDF

Kimberly Danelle Kirner (California State University Northridge)

The Dual Track Approach and My Responsibility to My Students •PowerPointPDF

Lauren Miller Griffith (University of Arkansas) 

Pedagogy Training for Graduate Students •PowerPoint

Carla D Martin (Harvard University)

The Anthropologist and the Digital •PowerPointPDF (with live links)