Executive Board Officers
  • Marla Frederick

    President

    Marla Frederick is Professor of African and African American Studies and the Study of Religion at Harvard University. She is the author of Between Sundays: Black Women and Everyday Struggles of Faith (U. of California, 2003), and co-author of Local Democracy Under Siege: Activism, Public Interests and Private Politics (NYU Press, 2007), which won the 2008 Book Award from the Society for the Anthropology of North America. Frederick’s research interests include questions emerging from the intersections of religion, race, gender, media, politics and economics. She is currently completing an ethnography which looks at the rise of African American religious broadcasters and their influence in the US and Jamaica.

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  • David Simmons

    President-Elect

    David_SimmonsDavid Simmons is an associate professor in the Departments of Anthropology and Health Promotion, Education, and Behavior at the University of South Carolina. He studies health and healing practices as they intersect with various fields of power in a range of historical and contemporary contexts. An award-winning teacher, he has also been recognized for his outstanding efforts on behalf of Haitian agricultural workers by the American Embassy in Santo Domingo and was awarded the Distinguished American Citizen Award (2002) as well as the Joseph F. Wall Sesquicentennial Service Award (2004) from Grinnell College. His publications include numerous peer-reviewed journal articles as well as the book, Modernizing Medicine in Zimbabwe: HIV/AIDS and Traditional Healers

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  • Angela Howell

    Secretary/Treasurer

    AMcMillanHowellAngela Howell is an Assistant Professor at Morgan State University in Baltimore, Maryland. Dr. Howell joined the faculty in 2007. At Morgan State, Dr. Howell is the only anthropologist and the Coordinator of the Anthropology Concentration. Her research interests are African American identity, youth culture, social constructions of reality, religious expression, race, ethnicity and gender, educational institutions, and literacy.

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  • Dawn Elissa Fischer

    General Editor

    Dawn-Elissa Fischer is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Africana Studies at San Francisco State University, where she teaches courses on black popular culture, digital research design and visual ethnography. Dr. Fischer has worked on a number of different community-based campaigns using hip hop to address issues of voter disenfranchisement, gender based violence, literacy and the digital divide.

  • Aimee Cox

    Transforming Anthropology Co‑Editor

    Aimee Meredith Cox is a cultural anthropologist and assistant professor of performance and African and African American Studies. She received her PhD in Anthropology from the University of Michigan where she also held a postdoctoral fellowship with the Center for the Education of Women. Dr. Cox’s research and teaching interests include expressive culture and performance; urban youth culture; public anthropology; Black girlhood and Black feminist theory. She is currently completing a book entitled, Shapeshifters: Black Girls and the Choreography of Citizenship in Post-Industrial Detroit.

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  • Dana-Ain Davis

    Transforming Anthropology Co‑Editor

    Dana-Ain Davis is an Associate Professor in the Queens College Extension Center, where she is also the Associate Chair. She is the author of Battered Black Women and Welfare Reform (SUNY, 2006) and several articles that focus on the impact of welfare reform and neoliberalism. Davis’s current research is in the United States and focuses on race, gender, poverty, reproductive health, community organizing, and the politics of activist anthropology.

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  • Kimberly Eison Simmons

    Member‑at‑Large

    Kimberly Eison Simmons is an Associate Professor of Anthropology and African American Studies at the University of South Carolina in Columbia. Her research interests include racialization processes, women’s organizations and activism, identity formation and the cultural construction of race, color, and gender in the Dominican Republic, the United States, and throughout African Diaspora communities. She is the author of Reconstructing Racial Identities and the African Past in the Dominican Republic (University Press of Florida, 2009).

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  • Raymond Codrington

    Member-At-Large

    Raymond Codrington is Senior Research Associate at the Aspen Institute Roundtable on Community Change. He supervises projects that address structural racism in domestic and international contexts. Prior to joining the Aspen Institute, Codrington was the Founding Director of the Julian C. Dixon Institute for Cultural Studies and Assistant Curator in the Department of Anthropology at the Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County. He also held the positions of Sandy Boyd Postdoctoral Fellow at the Field Museum’s Center for Cultural Understanding and Change and Assistant Professor at the State University of New York at Purchase.

    Members of Interest
  • Orisanmi Burton

    Webmaster

    Orisanmi Burton is a doctoral student in Social Anthropology at the University of North Carolina – Chapel Hill. His research interests include youth culture, masculinity, social movements, political economy, and technology as they relate to the African diaspora. As a trained librarian he brings to the discipline a commitment to presenting and preserving counter-hegemonic narratives. Orisanmi has developed rites of passage programming at The Brotherhood/Sister Sol in Harlem, led a youth-ethnography project in rural Brazil, and continues to collect oral histories along internal slave routes in Ghana. He is currently serving as an archivist for a new digital photo archive of the Association of Black Anthropologists.

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  • Michael Ralph

    Transforming Anthropology  Editor

    Michael Ralph is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Social and Cultural Analysis at New York University. He holds a Ph.D. in Anthropology from the University of Chicago. Michael’s scholarship centers on risk, injury, liability, citizenship and sovereignty in Senegal, the United States and Eritrea. Michael has published in Souls, Social Text, Public Culture, South Atlantic Quarterly, Journal of the History of Sport, and Transforming Anthropology. He is an Associate Editor of Transforming Anthropology, as well as a member of the Social Text Editorial Collective and the Editorial Boards of Hau: Journal of Ethnographic TheorySport in Society and Disability Studies Quarterly.

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  • Oneka LaBennett

    Membership

    Oneka LaBennett is Associate Professor of African and African American Studies, and Women’s Studies at Fordham University. She is also Research Director of the Bronx African American History Project   (BAAHP). Her teaching focuses on African Diasporic identities, popular youth culture, and West Indian migration. Dr. LaBennett is the author of She’s Mad Real: Popular Culture and West Indian Girls in Brooklyn (NYU Press 2011), and co-editor of Racial Formation in the Twenty-First Century (UC Press forthcoming).

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  • Karen Williams

    Anthropology News Editor

    Karen G. Williams is a Ph.D. candidate at the Graduate Center at the City University of New York. Her research interests include the criminal justice system, governance, race/racism(s), social stratification, and medical anthropology. Williams’ current research project is focused in the United States and examines state-wide prisoner reentry and risk reduction initiatives in Missouri and Kansas. She is the co-author of Study Guide for Let Nobody Turn Us Around (Rowan & Littlefield, 2009). Williams received her MA in Performance Studies from New York University and her BFA from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago.

  • Melanie E. L. Bush

    John L. Gwaltney Scholarship

    Melanie E. L. Bush is Associate Professor of Sociology and Anthropology at Adelphi University. She has published numerous articles in scholarly journals and presented at a range of national conferences particularly in the fields of sociology and anthropology, and in 2003 she was a prize winner of the Praxis Award, given by the Washington Association of Professional Anthropologists for outstanding achievement in translating knowledge into action in addressing contemporary social problems.

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  • Riche Daniel Barnes

    Works in Progress

    Dr. Barnes is Assistant Professor in Afro-American Studies at Smith College. She currently specializes in race, class, and gender dynamics in African American families as they are experienced in the U.S. political economy, race and identity formation across the African Diaspora, and black women’s articulations of feminism. Her research and publications have focused on cultural shifts in black women’s perceptions of career and family in the U.S. and abroad. She is currently working on a manuscript that explores black women’s career and family gender strategies as they are rooted in class position and racial identity.

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  • Aimee Cox

    Vera Green Award Committee

    Aimee Meredith Cox is a cultural anthropologist and assistant professor of Performance and African and African American Studies. She received her Ph.D. in Anthropology from the University of Michigan where she also held a postdoctoral fellowship with the Center for the Education of Women. Dr. Cox’s research and teaching interests include expressive culture and performance; urban youth culture; public anthropology; Black girlhood and Black feminist theory. She is currently completing a book entitled, Shapeshifters: Black Girls and the Choreography of Citizenship in Post-Industrial Detroit.

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  • Alisha Winn

    Archivist

    Alisha R. Winn is an Assistant Professor of Anthropology at Fayetteville State University. Her recent research focused on the social and cultural dynamics of the Atlanta Life Insurance Company, one of the largest, most successful African American financial institutions in the twentieth century. Her research interests include: heritage preservation, ethnicity, identity, class, oral narratives, museum studies,and the impact that learning Black history from community elders instead of textbooks has on youth.