Category Archives: Call for Papers: Conferences

CFP for SHCY 2015 Conference

Legal Childhoods
SHCY Panel Submission/CFP
This panel is interested in the long historical legacy of juvenile subjects as represented, and perhaps, created through the discourse of imperial law. We are particularly interested in a trans-Atlantic conversation that may include representations of renaissance English child subjects, colonial child subjects, or early American child subjects as legal manifestations of personhood and minor citizenship find respite in these juvenile bodies. This conversation will inevitably raise questions about what constitutes childhood through an imperialistic eye and long reaching legal precedence; the critical attention of which is often elided by idealistic, ideological, and national understandings of childhood. Papers that take up these critical questions by recognizing legal childhood and juvenile bodies as intersectional subjects in imperialist legal discourses, where race, class, gender, and citizenship define a person’s access to a privileged and/or exploited youth will be given preference. We encourage submissions that address the shifting legal identity of children as they move (or are moved) across geographic space, permeating national borders, and papers that consider the materiality of the juvenile body in relation to place(s) and to object(s).
Interested participants should send a 250 word abstract to gocasion@english.umass.edu and afsimpso@english.umass.edu by  August 31, 2014.

 

CFP: Childfriendly Cities

4th International Conference on Geographies of Children, Young people  and Families.
San Diego. January 12-15, 2015
http://icgcsandiego.wix.com/ypbw

Paper Session Organizers: Lia Karsten and Willem van Vliet

Session theme: Childfriendly cities: critical approaches

Many of the papers within children’s geographies end with some kind of recommendation for the building of childfriendly cities. But what do we mean by childfriendly cities? In this workshop we want to explore different ways of conceptualizing children, cities, childfriendliness and their interrelationships.

Policies aimed at childfriendly cities presuppose that cities are not childfriendly: cities have to change in order to become child-friendly. This supposition reveals an anti-urban way of thinking. It juxtaposes the urban jungle vs. the rural idyll.These contrasting connotations are very much based on the relatively poor provision of outdoor play facilities in urban environments and their assumed abundance in rural environments. But today, enrichment activities have become more prominent in many children’s everyday life.  Will this emphasis on enrichment activities change the rural into the urban idyll?

Childfriendly approaches/policies/actions  and the conceptualization of children as the ‘same’ as and as ‘different’ from adults. In modernist planning, childfriendly interventions often imply creating child-specific facilities and spaces: designated  especially and ‘only’ for children. This approach views children as fundamentally different from adults. They are defined as vulnerable and in need of specific protection and provision.  Age-specific playgrounds are a good example of this. Another way of creating childfriendly cities is by building inclusive cities in which children’s needs are taken into account without isolating them in their own domains. Wide sidewalks, as advocated by Jane Jacobs, are a good  example.  This second approach views children as essentially similar to adults as citizens of the city.  The question thus arises: Which of these two approaches is better for creating child-friendly cities? This question, in turn, leads to an examination of different definitions of  childfriendliness.

Childfriendly cities and children’s own definitions. What do children themselves consider childfriendly? Do their definitions differ from those held by  adults?  Further, children are not a homogeneous group.  Do we find differences in children’s own definitions of child-friendliness across gender, age group, social class, racial and ethnic background, residential location?  And how can we best support children’s participation in city planning and urban development to promote child-friendly outcomes??

This paper session aims to critically explore different issues related to childfriendly cities.

We invite researchers to send title and abstract of a maximum of 250 words by August 15 to both Lia Karsten (c.j.m.karsten@uva.nl) and Willem van Vliet (willem@colorado.edu  ). We will reply before the 1st of September and intend to select papers for a special issue of the Journal: Children, Youth and Environments to be published in 2015-16.

CFP, Conf Funding, & Grad Awards: Education, Teaching, History and Popular Culture

Popular Cultural Association/American Culture Association

Education, Teaching, History & Popular Culture 

Call for Papers

The Area of Education, Teaching, History and Popular Culture is now accepting submissions for the PCA/ACA National Conference, New Orleans, LA, held April 1-4, 2015 at the New Orleans Marriott (http://www.marriott.com/hotels/travel/msyla-new-orleans-marriott). For detailed information please seehttp://pcaaca.org/national-conference/.

Educators, librarians, archivists, scholars, independent researchers and students at all levels are encouraged to apply.  Submissions that explore, connect, contrast, or otherwise address area themes of schooling, education, teaching (including preparing teachers/preservice teacher education), history, archival studies, and/or their linkages to popular culture from all periods are desired.   Sample topics for papers include, but are not limited to:

  • Reflections/linkages between schooling and popular culture in the United States and internationally/multinationally;
  • The role of history in education, teaching, or preservice teacher education in the United States;
  • The use(s) of popular culture in education, teaching, or preservice teacher education in the United States;
  • How education has impacted pop culture/how popular culture has impacted education in the United States;
  • Representations of teaching and/or schooling in popular culture throughout history in the United States;
  • Using popular culture to subvert/supplement prescriptive curricula in schooling;
  • The impact/emergence of LGBTQ studies in schooling and education;
  •  Queering any of the area fields (education, schooling, history, archival studies, teaching, preservice teacher education, popular culture);
  • Developing means to re-integrate foundations of education into preservice teacher education;
  • Tapping into (or resisting) popular technology to improve instruction;
  • Exploring the intersections of social media, social identity, and education.

Deadline for proposals is November 1, 2014. To be considered, interested individuals should please prepare an abstract of between 100-250 words.  Individuals must submit electronically by visiting http://pcaaca.org/national-conference-2/proposing-a-presentation-at-the-conference/ and following the directions therein.

Graduate students are STRONGLY encouraged to submit their completed papers for consideration for conference award.  Graduate students, early career faculty and those traveling internationally in need of financial assistance are encouraged to apply: http://pcaaca.org/grant/overview.php.

Decisions will be communicated within approximately two weeks of deadline.  All presenters must be members of the American Culture Association or the Popular Culture Association by the time of the conference.  Any further inquiries can be directed to Dr. Edward Janak at ejanak@uwyo.edu.  For additional information about the conference, please seehttp://pcaaca.org/national-conference-2/

CFP: “In Relation: Children, Youth, and Belonging”

Society for the History of Children and Youth
Eighth Biennial Conference: “In Relation: Children, Youth, and Belonging”
shcyhome.org

June 24-26, 2015
University of British Columbia
Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada

Submission Deadline: October 1, 2014

The Program Committee invites proposals for panels, papers, roundtables or workshops that explore histories of children and youth from any place and in any era. We will, however, give particular attention to proposals with a strong historical emphasis and that bear on the theme of this year’s conference. Relationships are foundational to human lives and to children’s experience of the world. They might involve coercion and suffering, or agency and liberation. Domestic relationships with parents, caregivers, siblings, relatives, and pets shape young people’s sense of self, their experiences and their place in the world. Wider relationship circles, including those with peers and adult professionals such as teachers, doctors, police, and social workers, likewise affect young people’s position in the world in diverse ways. The complex effects of large-scale events and phenomena including colonization, imperialism, war, industrialization, urbanization, and disease epidemics, among others, have both direct and indirect effects on young peoples’ relationships that vary across time and cultural context. Virtual relationships facilitated by letter writing and, more recently, digital technology, provide young people with a distinctive window onto international connections and cross-cultural influences. Relations of power, often uneven and always nuanced by gender, race, class, sexuality, and (dis)ability, flow through all relationships that young people forge and encounter. Historical research that explores the varied meanings attached to the range of relationships young people experience usefully expands our understanding of both the past and present.

Foci for papers and sessions, for example, might explore:

  • theorizing relationality as a key concept in the history of children and youth, characterizing intimate as well as global relations
  • Indigeneity and relations shaped by colonization and imperialism, as well as Indigenous agency and resilience
  • the impact of large and small scale social change on young people’s relationships
  • relationships shaped by race, class, gender, ethnicity, sexuality and (dis)ability
  • the challenge of historicising emotional aspects of relationships within families, communities and nations
  • intergenerational relations in the nature and flow of young people’s lives
  • the spatiality of relationships in homes, schools, institutions and other places
  • the role of travel, mobility, and migration in forging and maintaining relationships for young people
  • the fashioning and living out of childhood and youth as a dialogic or relational process.
  • Children, youth, and adult professionals

We strongly encourage, and will give priority to, submissions of complete panel sessions that incorporate international representation and global perspectives. Individual papers will also be considered. We also welcome proposals for non-traditional and experimental panel sessions that extend historical research in unusual directions (eg. research-in-progress workshops, methods and theory workshops, material culture explorations, etc.)

For more information, go to the conference website: http://shcyhome.org/conference/

CFP: Girls and boys at play in multicultural urban contexts

Session at the Urban Sociology Mid-term Conference seeking papers…
Research Network 37 “Urban Sociology” Mid-Term Conference
Conference theme: “Public spaces and private lives in the contemporary city”
European Sociological Association
Lisbon, 19-21 November 2014
Session: “Girls and boys at play in multicultural urban contexts. Exploring difference in public space trough sportive and ludic experiences” 
Download more details on the conference, the session, contacts, and deadlines here: