Category Archives: Call for Papers: Conferences

CFP: Young people’s migration in Asia

International Workshop Series: The Emotions of Migration

Workshop 2
Young People’s Migration Within and Throughout Asia: Managing Emotions, Identities and Relationships 

Date: 19 August 2014 to 20 August 2014

York Centre for Asian Research and the Children’s Studies Program (Department of Humanities) York University, Toronto Canada

Call for papers: Workshop 2 calls for empirical research papers – historical and contemporary- on children and young people’s emotional experiences of migration within and throughout Asia. Papers should focus on mixed feelings of (but not limited to) elation, loneliness, hope, frustration, confusion, relief, fear, freedom and disappointment in the migration process.

There is a preference for participant-centred research in South and Southeast Asia prioritizing the following themes:

  1. Migration for work and marriage in a historical context (especially in plantations and estates)
  2. Contemporary experiences of moving for work, marriage and school – managing mixed feelings  
  3. Left Behind – adjusting to absence and creating and maintaining relationships

Submission and Funding: Please submit contact details and paper abstract (maximum of 300 words) by April 4th 2014 to Dr. Kabita Chakrabortry kabitac@yorku.ca. 

Successful applicants will be notified by late-April and are required to send in a complete draft paper (6000 – 8000 words) by July 8, 2014. Partial or full funding will be granted to successful applicants. Participants are encouraged to seek alternate funds for travel from their home institutions

Webpagehttp://ycar.apps01.yorku.ca/research/programmes-projects/emotions-migration-asia/

 

CFP: Kinship as Exclusion AAA Panel DUE March 21st

2014 AAA Panel Call for Papers

Kinship as Exclusion

Deadline: March 21st 2014

Organizers:

Geoffrey Hughes (gfhughs@umich.edu)

Sandhya K. Narayanan (sandkn@umich.edu)

Discussants:

Janet Carsten

Professor of Social and Cultural Anthropology

University of Edinburgh

Susan McKinnon

Professor and Chair of Anthropology

University of Virginia

           Discussions of kinship and family, both in popular culture and more scholarly accounts, tend to turn on themes of love, connection and the formation of new social bonds and support networks. This is reflected in anthropological definitions of kinship that emphasize “mutuality of being” or “shared substance.” However, kinship and family also have a darker side: violence, disconnection and the breaking of bonds. Take, for instance, the biblical account of kinship in which the first family (Adam and Eve) produces the first murder (Cain and Abel). What is lost in accounts of kinship when its inclusionary aspects become divorced from its exclusionary aspects? Clearly, it will not suffice to replace the tendency to view kinship as positive with a tendency to view it as negative, but how can research on kinship productively engage with its ambivalence as a social institution? How can we enrich ethnographic accounts of kinship by paying attention to the fact that, when kinship determines the distribution of labor, property and other resources, people may be forced to confront a zero-sum proposition? The provision of care to some people means less care for others; the provision of a share of inheritance may diminish the amount available to others; offers of mutual defense to some could mean the denial of that offer of mutual defense for others. In these situations, what are the factors that help or coerce people to make such divisive decisions? Who is excluded and what exactly are the categories of kin that emerge through kinship’s inclusionary and exclusionary dynamics?  This panel aims to answer these questions by borrowing heavily from both classical anthropological theorizations of kinship as well as new kinship studies, with its useful problematizing of categories like nature, the self and self-interest. We welcome submissions from scholars working across the globe on projects embracing a broad range of classical and contemporary theoretical commitments.

Please send an abstract of 250-300 words to Geoffrey (gfhugh@umich.edu) and Sandhya (sandkn@umich.edu) by March 21st 2014. We will respond to everyone by the 25th.

 

CFP: The Emotions of Migration

*International Workshop Series: The Emotions of Migration*

*Workshop 2*
Young People's Migration Within and Throughout Asia: Managing Emotions,
Identities and Relationships

Date: 19 August 2014 to 20 August 2014

Venue: York Centre for Asian Research and the Children' s Studies Program
(Department of Humanities) York University, Toronto Canada

*Call for papers*: Workshop 2 calls for empirical research papers --
historical and contemporary -- on children and young people's
emotional experiences of migration within and throughout Asia.
Papers should focus on mixed feelings of (but not limited to)
elation, loneliness, hope, frustration, confusion, relief, fear,
freedom and disappointment in the migration process.

There is a preference for participant-centred research in
South and Southeast Asia prioritizing the following themes:

1. Migration for work and marriage in a historical context
(especially in plantations and estates)
2. Contemporary experiences of moving for work, marriage and
school --  managing mixed feelings
3. Left Behind -- adjusting to absence and creating and maintaining
relationships

*Submission and Funding: Please submit contact details and paper
abstract (maximum of 300 words) by April 4th 2014 to:
Dr. Kabita Chakrabortry kabitac@yorku.ca <
mailto:kabitac@yorku.ca>.

Successful applicants will be notified by late-April and are required
to send in a complete draft paper (6000 - 8000 words) by July 8, 2014.
Partial or full funding will be granted to successful applicants.
Participants are encouraged to seek alternate funds for travel from
their home institutions

*Webpage*:
http://ycar.apps01.yorku.ca/research/programmes-projects/emotions-migration-asia/

CFP: Young People’s Migration Within and Throughout Asia: Managing Emotions, Identities and Relationships

*International Workshop Series: The Emotions of Migration*

*Workshop 2*
Young People’s Migration Within and Throughout Asia: Managing Emotions,
Identities and Relationships

Date: 19 August 2014 to 20 August 2014

Venue: York Centre for Asian Research and the Children’ s Studies Program
(Department of Humanities) York University, Toronto Canada

*Call for papers*: Workshop 2 calls for empirical research papers —
historical and contemporary — on children and young people’s
emotional experiences of migration within and throughout Asia.
Papers should focus on mixed feelings of (but not limited to)
elation, loneliness, hope, frustration, confusion, relief, fear,
freedom and disappointment in the migration process.

There is a preference for participant-centred research in
South and Southeast Asia prioritizing the following themes:

1. Migration for work and marriage in a historical context
(especially in plantations and estates)
2. Contemporary experiences of moving for work, marriage and
school —  managing mixed feelings
3. Left Behind — adjusting to absence and creating and maintaining
relationships

*Submission and Funding: Please submit contact details and paper
abstract (maximum of 300 words) by April 4th 2014 to:
Dr. Kabita Chakrabortry kabitac@yorku.ca <mailto:kabitac@yorku.ca
<mailto:kabitac@yorku.ca> >.

Successful applicants will be notified by late-April and are required
to send in a complete draft paper (6000 – 8000 words) by July 8, 2014.
Partial or full funding will be granted to successful applicants.
Participants are encouraged to seek alternate funds for travel from
their home institutions

*Webpage*:
http://ycar.apps01.yorku.ca/research/programmes-projects/emotions-migration
-asia/

<http://ycar.apps01.yorku.ca/research/programmes-projects/emotions-migration
-asia/
>

CFP: Children, Young People and Families in Changing Urban Spaces

 CHILDREN, YOUNG PEOPLE AND FAMILIES IN CHANGING URBAN SPACES 

3rd and 4th September 2014

Centre for Children and Youth

University of Northampton, UK

 Organising committee:

John Horton, Faith Tucker, Sophie Hadfield-Hill (University of Birmingham), Michelle Pyer, Rebekah Ryder

Keynote speaker:

Tracey Skelton (National University of Singapore)

Themes:

This conference will bring together new, multidisciplinary research exploring the lives, issues and experiences of children, young people and families in diverse, international urban contexts. In three senses, we propose that it is timely for researchers, policy-makers and practitioners with an interest in this field to share experiences of working in changing urban contexts.

First, so many urban spaces are undergoing profound changes as a result of interconnected political-economic processes, such as economic crisis and austerity politics in the global north, or uneven development and large-scale urbanisation in the global south. This conference will bring together researchers and perspectives at the vanguard of these transformations.

Second, there is evidence that children, young people and families are positioned, and socially constructed, in diverse and sometimes unprecedented ways in changing urban contexts. In wide-ranging research on participation, activisms, political movements, play or independent mobilities, for example, it is evident that changing urban spaces may afford new opportunities or new limits to the agency of children, young people and families. This conference offers an opportunity for diverse research, from diverse locations, to be discussed.

Third, research on urban children, young people and families is itself changing. As a number of publications and collections have made clear, interdisciplinary collaboration and conversations are increasingly commonplace. For example, new insights have resulted from collaborations between: researchers in urban studies, childhood studies and children’s geographies; researchers, young people and youth workers; quantitative, qualitative and GIS/GPS-based research; academic researchers, planners, policy-makers and practitioners; or social scientists and the creative industries. Research on childhood, youth, families and urbanity has also been enlivened and extended through engagements with conceptualisations of the social-material and bodily-emotional-affective nature of identities, relationships and urban built environments and social-cultural geographies. There are surely numerous exciting ways in which researchers from diverse backgrounds might continue to collaborate.

With all this in mind, we invite papers which engage with children and young people in relation to the following topics:

  • Economic crisis and austerity politics;
  • Designing environments for children, young people and families;
  • Movement and mobilities;
  • Urbanisation and economic development in the global south;
  • Play and popular culture;
  • Disabilities, health and wellbeing;
  • Identities, subcultures and friendships;
  • Exclusions, vulnerability, support and care;
  • Innovative concepts and research methods in urban research;
  • Work and economic participation;
  • Social media and digital technologies in the city;
  • Policing, control and surveillance;
  • Urban play, identities, subcultures and popular culture;
  • Built environments and public spaces;
  • Participation, activism and citizenship.

Abstracts (c.200 words) should be emailed to: faith.tucker@northampton.ac.uk by 16thApril 2014.

Conference information:

Information about registration for the conference will be available in due course.  The standard fee for this two-day conference will be £125; postgraduate fee £65.  (Additional charge for overnight accommodation.)

For further information, please contact Dr Faith Tucker (email:faith.tucker@northampton.ac.uk ).