Category Archives: Call for Papers: Conferences

CALL FOR PAPERS: Conference on Childhood Studies. Values of Childhood and Childhood Studies. May, 7–9th, 2014. Oulu, Finland

CALL FOR PAPERS
Conference on Childhood Studies
Values of Childhood and Childhood Studies
May, 7–9th, 2014
Oulu, Finland

The Finnish Society for Childhood Studies invites submissions for proposals for an international conference to be held in Oulu May 7–9th, 2014. The multidisciplinary conference on childhood studies has established itself as the venue for research on children and childhood in Finland. The focus of the sixth conference will be on values – the values of childhood as well as the values in and valuation of childhood studies.

The keynote speakers are:
– Professor Alan Prout (Sociology of Childhood, University of Warwick)
– Professor Pia Christensen (Anthropology and Childhood Studies, University of Leeds)
– Professor Eva Johansson (Early Childhood Education, University of Stavanger)
– Professor Astri Andresen (Archaeology, History, Cultural Studies and Religion, University of Bergen)
– Development Manager Mikko Oranen (National Institute for Health and Welfare, Oulu)

The conference offers space for an interdisciplinary exchange of ideas for researchers who work with children. We welcome papers that respond to the main theme from different viewpoints including but not limited to:

– Ethical questions and values in childhood research
– Methodological challenges in childhood research
– Health and equality in childhood
– Childhood and moral values
– Childhood in plural societies
– Northern childhoods
– Historicising the values of childhood
– Gendered values of childhood
– Languages of childhood
– Values in education
– Contested and conflicting values of childhood
– Institutional and individual values of childhood
– Vulnerable childhoods
– Children’s participation
– Other viewpoints

Sessions will be arranged either in English or in Finnish. A proposal can be submitted for:
– Individual paper presentation: 20–30 minutes including discussion.
– Self-organised sessions: groups may propose to organize a full session of 90 minutes including presentations (3–4 individual papers and discussion, or round table discussion).
– Poster presentation: sessions will be set up for conference participants to interact with poster presenters.

Please submit abstracts for presentations electronically through the conference website (http://childhood2014.wordpress.com/call-for-papers/submit-online/). The abstract should contain the following information:
– the title of the presentation
– the type of presentation (individual paper/ self-organised session/ poster)
– the name/s and institution/s of the presenter/s
– mailing address and E-mail address
– a 250-word abstract
– audiovisual requirements, and
– up to five keywords.

Important dates:
December 31th 2013: Deadline for submission of abstracts
February 15th 2014: Notification of acceptance of papers
March 15th 2014: Final date for registration with reduced fee
April 15th 2014: Final date for registration

We warmly welcome you to Oulu!
Scientific Committee and Organizing Committee

For further information, see the conference pages:http://childhood2014.wordpress.com/
Inquiries: child2014@oulu.fi

CFP – The Law and the Child in Historical Perspective, 1400-2000

The Law and the Child in Historical Perspective, 1400-2000

June 1-2, 2014
University of Minnesota Law School,
229 19th Ave. South, Minneapolis, MN 55455

The study of the history of children, youth and childhood has grown dramatically in the last two decades, making age a new category of historical analysis.  The Law and the Child will focus on law’s central role in changing understandings of childhood and children’s experiences, considering among other things selfhood, family, market relations, society, and state.  Our hope is for a broad reach geographically and chronologically, from the Medieval World to the Twenty-First Century, and for papers that consider the multiple sources that intersect in the legal construction of childhood and in children’s lived legal experiences.  These include race, class, gender, disability, sexuality, ethnicity, psychology, dependency, agency, citizenship, and (il)legitimacy.  We also hope papers will address topics in both civil and criminal law.  The conference, one of a series begun in 2007, is intended to showcase the work of junior scholars working the field of legal history and to bring them into conversation with senior scholars.  It is co-sponsored by the University of Minnesota Law School and History Department, the Childhood and Youth Studies Across the Disciplines IAS Research Collaborative at the University of Minnesota, the Indiana University School of Law, the University of Pennsylvania Law School and History Department, the University of Illinois College of Law, the University of Michigan Law School, and the University of Chicago Department of History.

Interested participants should submit a proposal of no more than 300 words, in Word format, accompanied by a cv of no more than 3 pages to Barbara Welke at welke004@umn.edu.  All proposals are due by 20 December 2013.  Applicants will be notified by email no later than 17 February 2014 whether their proposals have been accepted for presentation.  No previously published work will be accepted, as the conference is designed to provide a forum for productive and supportive discussion of works in progress.

Accepted participants will be required to submit a full paper, in Word format, of no more than 10,000 words by 1 May 2014.  All papers will be pre-circulated on a password-protected website, and read by all participants.  A modest travel and accommodations budget will be provided for all presenters.

 

CFP – CSCY 5th International Conference

CALL FOR PAPERS

You are warmly invited to attend the CSCY 5th International Conference entitled: “Researching children’s everyday lives: socio-cultural contexts” to be held at the Kenwood Hotel, Sheffield, UK on 1-3 July 2014.

This conference will explore the idea of the ‘everyday’ as a key component of children’s lives, past and present and cross culturally.  To do this means moving away from a ‘problem’ focus on children and childhood by recognising that what counts as the mundane and every day for different children can be radically diverse in different times and places.

Further information about this conference can be found on our websitewww.sheffield.ac.uk/cscy, and please do not hesitate to contact me if you have any queries.

CFP: On the Move: In the World: Mobility and Young People

On the Move, In the World…
Mobility and Young People
A One-day Conference Organized by ARCYP in partnership with ACCUTE At the Congress of the Humanities and Social Sciences
Brock University
May 27, 2014
DEADLINE: November 1, 2013

Website: http://arcyp.ca

Mobility and young people: taken together, these terms produce both anxiety and possibility. On the move in the world, young people are widely perceived to be in danger or at risk. Yet young people’s mobility may also be aspirational or generative, as adventure, transformation, good fortune, and border-crossings of all kinds can effect changes in status and re-orientations of consciousness and identity. Further, the narratives circulated by and for those youth are themselves subject to revisions once they, too, have been put in motion. And the very thought of young people’s mobility puts us in the realms of affect and embodiment, of ability and impairment. Affect raises questions about the emotional landscape of the young people so moved, how young people are deployed in a variety of media to move adults, and the ways in which we map and describe our attachments to those cultural objects we find to be moving. The body in motion invites us to think of
childhood in terms of kinesthetics, choreography, and ideologies and architectures of enablement, while the very idea of mobile youth asks us to consider spatio-temporal relationships: how young people move through space and time, measuring time by space and vice versa. All of these ways of thinking about mobility in the context of youth cultures take various narrative, political, aesthetic, and conceptual forms— narratives that are, themselves, subject to movement and therefore subject to revision, reconsideration, subversion, and change. Mobility itself might be seen to generate new youth
movements—opening up ways to think about the cultures of young people and for young people to move our sense of culture.

ARCYP invites proposals for papers (or panels) that consider any and all facets of young people’s mobility/movement: Topics to be considered under the theme of “mobility and young people” may include (but are not limited to):
• Danger, Risk and Safety
• Dancing Children
• Border Crossings and Home(land) Security Systems
• Narrative Subversions and Revisions
• Movement as Performance/Choreography
• Narratives of Upward/Downward Mobility
• Transformations through Mobility/Mobilizing Transformations
• Mobile Audiences and Audiences of Mobility
• Temporalities of Youth
• Movement as Affect and Affect as “Being Moved”
• Planes, Trains, and Automobiles
• Capitalism’s Children
• Immigration and Generations
• Ability and Impairment
• Kinesthetics or Kin-aesthetics
• Mapping Youth Cultures
• Circuits of Childhood
• Mobilizing Youth Polities
• Digital Movement and Mobile Communication

Following the instructions at http://accute.ca/joint-sessions/<http://accute.ca/joint-sessions/> , if you are submitting a paper, send three documents in separate electronic files directly to admin@arcyp.ca by November 1, 2013:
(1) A 300- to 500-word proposal, without identifying marks;
(2) A 100-word abstract;
(3) 50-word biographical statement; and
(4) A Proposal Submissions Information Sheet.

If you are submitting a panel proposal, please include:
(1) A 700-word panel description, plus 300-word abstracts for each paper in the panel;
(2) A 150-word panel abstract;
(3) 50-word biographical statements for each member of the panel; and
(4) A Proposal Submissions Information Sheet, including contact information for all panel participants.
NOTES: You must be a current member of ARCYP or ACCUTE to submit to this session. Rejected submissions will not be moved into the general “pool” of ACCUTE submissions.

CFP: Popular Cultural Association/American Culture Association: Education, Teaching, History & Popular Culture

Popular Cultural Association/American Culture Association

Education, Teaching, History & Popular Culture

Call for Papers

The Area of Education, Teaching, History and Popular Culture is now accepting submissions for the PCA/ACA National Conference, Chicago, IL, held April 16-19, 2014 at the Marriott Chicago—Downtown Magnificent Mile. (http://www.marriott.com/hotels/travel/chidt-chicago-marriott-downtown-magnificent-mile).

Educators, librarians, archivists, scholars, independent researchers and students at all levels are encouraged to apply. Submissions that explore, connect, contrast, or otherwise address area themes of schooling, education, teaching (including preparing teachers/preservice teacher education), history, archival studies, and/or their linkages to popular culture from all periods are desired. Sample topics for papers include, but are not limited to:

· Reflections/linkages between schooling and popular culture in the United States;

· The role of history in education, teaching, or preservice teacher education in the United States;

· The use(s) of popular culture in education, teaching, or preservice teacher education in the United States;

· How education has impacted pop culture/how popular culture has impacted education in the United States;

· Representations of teaching and/or schooling in popular culture throughout history in the United States;

· Cross-border/multinational examinations of popular culture and education;

· Using popular culture to subvert/supplement prescriptive curricula in schooling;

· The impact/emergence of LGBTQ studies in schooling and education;

· Queering any of the area fields (education, schooling, history, archival studies, teaching, preservice teacher education, popular culture);

· Developing means to re-integrate foundations of education into preservice teacher education;

· Tapping into (or resisting) popular technology to improve instruction;

· Multidisciplinary analyses of the interactions of schooling and popular culture.

Deadline for proposals is November 1, 2013. To be considered, interested individuals should please prepare an abstract of between 100-250 words and a brief biography of no more than 50 words. Individuals must submit electronically by visiting http://pcaaca.org/national-conference-2/proposing-a-presentation-at-the-conference/ and following the directions therein.

Graduate students are STRONGLY encouraged to submit their completed papers for consideration for conference award. Graduate students, early career faculty and those travelling internationally in need of financial assistance are encouraged to apply: http://pcaaca.org/grant/overview.php.

Decisions will be communicated within approximately two weeks of deadline. All presenters must be members of the American Culture Association or the Popular Culture Association by the time of the conference. Any further inquiries can be directed to Dr. Edward Janak at ejanak@uwyo.edu <mailto:ejanak@uwyo.edu> . For additional information about the conference, please see http://pcaaca.org/national-conference-2/