All posts by Caroline VanSickle

Assistant Professor (tenure-track) in Biological Anthropology at The College of New Jersey

The Sociology & Anthropology Department at the College of New Jersey (TCNJ) invites applications for a tenure-track appointment in biological anthropology at the Assistant Professor rank, to commence in Fall 2015. A Ph.D. is required by the time of appointment. We are seeking a teacher-scholar committed to undergraduate liberal arts education with an active research program in the health of modern humans. Any geographic focus is welcome. Successful candidates will be able to teach Introduction to Physical Anthropology and Human Evolution, and will develop courses related to health and human biology. We welcome a colleague whose research and teaching combines biological research and attention to human inequality. This hire will join a small but growing anthropology program that supports a rapidly expanding Public Health minor popular with pre-Med students. The hire will create courses in biological/physical anthropology that would complement our existing strengths in cultural anthropology, in preparation for launching a new anthropology major. Candidates should provide evidence that they can maintain a successful program of research at an undergraduate-focused public college with a limited research budget. The standard teaching load is three courses (usually two preps) per semester. In addition to teaching and research, faculty participates in the TCNJ community through a variety of service contributions. Candidates must provide evidence that they can contribute to the development of our intellectual community.

The TCNJ Department of Sociology & Anthropology values diversity and appreciates the perspective that members of a diverse community can bring to the enhancement of learning. For more information on our program and specific descriptions of the undergraduate specializations, visit our website at: http://sociology.pages.tcnj.edu/.

About TCNJ

Founded in 1855, TCNJ is a highly selective institution that has earned national recognition for its commitment to excellence. Emphasizing a residential experience for its nearly 6,000 undergraduates, TCNJ is one of Barron’s 75 Most Competitive American colleges, and U.S. News & World Report’s No. 1 public institution of its kind in the northern region of the country. The College also offers focused graduate programs in nursing, education and English. In 2006, TCNJ was awarded a Phi Beta Kappa chapter-an honor shared by less than 10 percent of colleges and universities nationally. A strong liberal arts core forms the foundation for programs offered through TCNJ’s seven schools-Arts & Communication; Business; Education; Humanities & Social Sciences; Science; Nursing, Health, and Exercise Science; and Engineering. TCNJ faculty members are teacher-scholars who share a commitment to liberal learning. TCNJ is located within an hour, by train, of NYC and Philadelphia. The College’s campus is set on 289 tree-lined acres in suburban Ewing Township and is known for its natural beauty. TCNJ has 39 major buildings, including the 4th-best college library in the nation, according to the Princeton Review. The School of Humanities and Social Sciences enrolls about 2200 majors across 11 B.A. programs.

Contact Information

Send a letter describing how your credentials meet these needs, a copy of your curriculum vitae, a recent publication, and names of three references by September 1, 2014, to Dr. Elizabeth Borland, Chair of Sociology & Anthropology, bioant@tcnj.edu. After initial review, candidates may then be asked to submit a statement of teaching philosophy, description of research program, student evaluations or other evidence of teaching effectiveness, and copies of additional publications. They may also be asked to request letters of recommendation be emailed by the recommenders. Employment is contingent upon completion of a successful background check. The successful applicant must present proof of eligibility to work in the United States.

The College of New Jersey is committed to creating a diverse community that supports its entire faculty, students and staff. All members of the TCNJ Campus Community share a responsibility for creating and sustaining a learning environment where difference is valued, equity is sought, and inclusiveness is practiced. The College of New Jersey is an equal opportunity employer and encourages applications from women and minorities.

https://jedi.tcnj.edu/webteam/employment/show_job.php?jobid=12867&category=Academic/Faculty%20Positions

 

Ohio University tenure-track assistant professor in biological anthropology

The Department of Sociology and Anthropology at Ohio University invites applications for a tenure‐track Assistant Professor of Anthropology in biological anthropology beginning in August 2015. We are interested in candidates with research and teaching specialization in human evolution, human diversity, and/or primate behavior and conservation. The specific research area is open. Ideal candidates will demonstrate an active and innovative research program and will be committed to excellence in undergraduate teaching. The successful candidate will be expected to teach upper‐level courses in Human Evolution and their areas of expertise, as well as Introduction to Biological Anthropology. Anthropology faculty at Ohio University currently teach 2 courses per semester: 1 upper‐level course and 1 Introduction to Biological Anthropology course. Housed in the Department of Sociology and Anthropology, the Anthropology Program (http://www.ohio.edu/socanth/anthropology/) consists of 7 full‐time faculty and approximately 110 majors, and maintains a core focus on public engagement and outreach across the subfields. This focus provides opportunities for undergraduate students through community‐based research and learning such as internships, field schools, independent research projects, and study abroad programs. Ohio University (http://www.ohio.edu/) is a Research Extensive institution that serves 20,000 students on a residential campus in Athens, Ohio, a college town seventy‐five miles southeast of Columbus, Ohio. To apply online, go to http://www.ohiouniversityjobs.com/postings/10188 and submit a letter of application, curriculum vitae, publications or other samples of scholarly writing, statement of teaching philosophy, recent teaching evaluations (if available), sample syllabi (if available), and contact information for three professional references, who will each receive an email invitation to upload a letter. Candidates should provide record of /or potential for scholarly activity involving students, as well as the demonstrated potential for effective teaching. The successful candidate is expected to have completed the Ph.D. at the time of appointment in August, 2015. The application submission deadline isSeptember 22, 2014. Questions may be directed to Nancy Tatarek, Search Committee Chair, at tatarek@ohio.edu. Ohio University is committed to creating a respectful and inclusive educational and workplace environment, and is an equal access/equal opportunity and affirmative action employer with a strong commitment to building and maintaining a diverse workforce. Women, persons of color, persons with disabilities, and veterans are encouraged to apply.

2014 CoGEA Award Call for Nominees

Nominations Due: May 1 to Suzanne Mattingly, AAA CoGEA Liaison at smattingly@aaanet.org.

The CoGEA Award (formerly known as the Squeaky Wheel Award), sponsored by the AAA Committee on Gender Equity in Anthropology (CoGEA), recognizes individuals whose service to the discipline, and the collective spirit of whose research, teaching and mentoring, demonstrates the courage to bring to light and investigate practices in anthropology that are potentially sexist and discriminatory based on gender presentation.

Continue reading

Archaeological Field School Peruvian Central Coast

The Institute of Peruvian Studies (IEP), one of the most prestigious research institutions on the social sciences in Latin America, announces the third season of its international field school in archaeological methods “Peruvian Central Coast”. Our field school offers training in mapping, survey and excavation techniques in the field as well as basic training via onsite workshops on statistical sampling in archaeology, bioarchaeological analysis, ceramic analysis and cataloguing, and lithic analysis. Prior experience in archaeological fieldwork is not required.

Continue reading

CFP: AFA column

As the co-editors of the AFA’s (Association for Feminist Anthropology) Anthropology News section notes, we are looking for submissions for both in print and online columns. This is a great opportunity to share your research with the readers of AN and support feminist research in humanities and social sciences!

There are no limitations on themes. Any contribution/report that focuses on feminist anthropological concerns and/or employs feminist research methodology is welcome.

Continue reading

2013 AAA BAS Student Paper/Poster Award Results

KisselThe winner of the BAS Student Paper/Poster Award for 2013 is Marc Kissel (University of Wisconsin, Madison) for his paper, “Testing Genetic Models of Human Evolutionary History against the Anthropological Record.”

Comparing measurements of supraorbital skeletal features from two Neandertal populations (Vindjia and Krapina), Kissel explores whether genetic drift or natural selection best explains observed morphological variability. Having found that observed variability cannot be explained by drift alone, he suggests that closer attention be paid to human reproductive behavior as illustrated in ethnographic record of hunter-gatherer communities, and that effective population size may not be a good indicator of census size in the Pleistocene.

ScottHonorable mention for this prize went to Jill E. Scott (University of Iowa) for her paper, “A 3-D Morphometric Analysis of Mandibular Symphyseal Variation in Homo.”

In this paper, Jill Scott tests whether various measurements of chin morphology can be used to successfully differentiate H. sapiens, H. neanderthalensis, and H. heidelbergensis. Using Principal Component Analysis, she finds that H. sapiens separate from both Neandertals and H. heidelbergensis along PC1. However along PC2, H. sapiens group with Neandertals to the exclusion of H. heidelbergensis. In this study, she explores new ways to measure and statistically test morphological differences that have been explored primarily in a qualitative manner in the literature.

BAS strives to increase student participation in AAA

BAS Student Representative Sarah Livengood initiated an informative survey to investigate the barriers to student participation in AAA. Eighty percent of 113 respondents indicated that they had never attended a AAA meeting. In large part this is because students don’t feel they have anything to present, but the cost of membership and registration is also an important factor. Students also indicated that they would be very interested in mentorship programs and sessions on professionalization. BAS is committed to engaging biological anthropology students in the broader discipline of anthropology and in AAA activities in particular and this preliminary survey sets the stage for future action.

JOB: American Museum of Natural History – Curator

The Division of Anthropology, American Museum of Natural History (AMNH) is conducting an open search for a Biological Anthropologist with a specialization in paleoanthropology at Assistant, Associate, or Full Curator rank. This is a tenure track position with rank and tenure negotiable depending on the candidate’s professional experience and accomplishment. Candidates of any rank should have a strong background and evidence of international leadership in paleoanthropological research. AMNH Biological Anthropology collections are some of the most comprehensive in the world, offering a unique opportunity for collections research. Continue reading

AAA Writers Circle

BAS members are invited to submit pieces to the AAA Writers Circle. As explained at the link below, this is a project meant to encourage anthropologists to write op-eds and magazine articles, and to engage in other ways with public media:

http://www.aaanet.org/resources/AAA-Writers-Circle.cfm

This is an opportunity for biological anthropologists to convey the importance of our science to broad audiences. Please feel free to contact Dr. Barbara J. King about this.

JOB: Boise State University – Human evolutionary ecology

The Department of Anthropology at Boise State University invites applications for a tenure-track position in Human Evolutionary Ecology at the level of assistant professor beginning August 1st, 2014. We seek a scientific anthropologist who will contribute to the department’s commitment to the study of human behavior from an evolutionary and ecological perspective. Areas of specialization may include human behavioral ecology, life history theory, reproductive ecology, cooperation and resource management, game theory and network analysis. In additional to strong quantitative skills, a fieldwork or lab component is preferable. Geographic area of specialization is open.

Continue reading

POSTDOC: Max Planck – Archaeology & Anthropology

Max Planck Weizmann Center for Integrative Archaeology and Anthropology, Leipzig, Germany

The newly established Max Planck Weizmann Center for Integrative Archaeology and Anthropology at the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Leipzig (Germany) invites applications for post-doctoral positions in the field of physical anthropology, palaeontology or zoology. The research track based in Leipzig will investigate bone and tooth structures with an emphasis on the evolutionary and functional morphology of the masticatory apparatus in primates and other mammals using morphometric, experimental and simulative approaches.

This research track will work in close contact with the Department of Human Evolution of the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology and with the Kimmel Center for Archaeological Science of the Weizmann Institute of Science, Israel.

We would expect the successful candidates to participate in research projects related to one of the following topics:

  • Structure-Function studies of hard tissues (bone and teeth)
  • Anatomy and histology of masticatory muscles and tooth supporting structures
  • Kinematics and dynamics of the masticatory apparatus

We seek highly qualified and motivated candidates with experience in tomographic imaging, experimental stress/strain analysis, finite element modelling, motion analysis, material testing, microscopy, immunohistochemistry and/or geometric morphometrics.

These positions are set to begin as early as January 2014, and applications will be considered until the positions are filled. The initial length of the appointments will be two years, with an option for extension. The selected candidates should have a Ph.D. (or be close to completion) and a significant track record of research. The Max Planck Society is committed to employing more physically impaired individuals and to increasing the share of women in areas where they are underrepresented, and therefore expressly encourages applications from such qualified individuals.

Applications including cover letter, curriculum vitae, reprints of selected publications, a short statement of research interests and the names of three referees should be sent to Dr Kornelius Kupczik (kornelius_kupczik@eva.mpg.de). You can email him with any questions as well

Tropical rainforest biodiversity: field and GIS tools for assessing, monitoring and mapping

III Edition now launched! – 24 August – 6 September 2013

Following on the successful first two editions, attended by students and professionals from all over the world, Trento Science Museum (Italy) and the University of Trento, in collaboration with Tanzania National Parks and the Danish Natural History Museum, announce the third edition of the Summer School on Tropical Rainforest Biodiversity to be held in the Udzungwa Mountains National Park, Tanzania, during 24 August – 6 September 2013.

The school will be based at the Udzungwa Ecological Monitoring Centre, a field station annexed to the Udzungwa Mountains National Park and managed by Trento Museum.

All information about the summer school can be downloaded following the links below (registration details will be posted soon). You can also contact udzungwa.school@gmail.com for further information.

2011 AAA BAS Student Paper/Poster Award Results

We are very pleased to announce the winner of this year’s student prize for outstanding presentation:

Meredith Ellis (Syracuse University) for her paper,  “A Disciplined Childhood: A Social Bioarchaeology of the Subadults of the Spring Street Presbyterian Church”. This paper is going to be published in an edited volume by Jennifer L. Thompson, Marta Alfonso-Durruty, John J. Crandall, “Tracing Childhood: Bioarchaeological Investigations of Early Lives in Antiquity”.

We are also pleased to announce a runner-up:

Valentine Volk (Cleveland State University), for her paper, “A Preliminary Assessment of Health and Disease at the Late Woodland Mayer Site, Vermillion, Ohio”.

2011 W.W. Howells Book Award Results

The 2011 W.W. Howells Book Award was presented to Wenda Trevathan for her book, Ancient Bodies, Modern Lives: How Evolution Has Shaped Women’s Health. Oxford University Press.

The book was recognized as an insightful and compelling consideration of the importance of evolution to women’s biology and health.

“Written by a leading light in the field of evolutionary medicine, Wenda Trevathan’s Ancient Bodies, Modern Lives describes how many contemporary health problems, particularly those of women, are the result of a mismatch between our “Stone Age” bodies that evolved over millions of years and our current (and radically changed) life styles. Thorough, authoritative, and easy to understand, this book offers suggestions for making informed decisions that impact the health of contemporary women and that of their children and their children’s children. Run, don’t walk (or stroll bipedally), to give this important and elegantly written book to your favorite bride-to-be, mother-to-be, mother, grandmother, or great grandmother! Inquisitive men will also find this book engaging.” –Dean Falk, Ph.D., Hale G. Smith Professor of Anthropology, Florida State University.