Standing Committees

CAE Commitees are organized by subject area. Committees work within CAE and other sections to advance research and practice in their area, including proposing and and sponsoring sessions at the AAA Annual Meeting. Each committee holds a business meeting at the Annual Meeting to plan for the next year. Joining a committee is a good way to become involved with CAE, meet other scholars with similar research or teaching interests, and learn how anthropology and education intersect.

Mission Committee

Co-Chair
Margaret LeCompte
Margaret.Lecompte@Colorado.edu

Co-Chair
Kevin Foster
University of Texas at Austin
kmfoster@mail.utexas.edu

#1 Ethnography of Schools and Communities/Ethnography of Educational Policies and Systems

Co-chair: Marguerite Wilson
Binghamton University
mwilson@binghamton.edu

Co-chair: Ian McDiarmid
ianjmcdiarmid@gmail.com

Committee 1 suports the mission of CAE in promoting social justice for historically marginalized groups and promoting collaborative work among academics and practitioners in local schools and other spaces.

#2 Multilingualism, (Multi)Literacies and Language in Schools and Communities

Chair: Sarah Newcomer
Washington State University Tri-Cities
Sarah.newcomer@tricity.wsu.edu

Co-Chair: Daisy Fredricks
University of Maryland
dfredric@umd.edu

In their research in language, literacy and learning, members of Committee 2 are dedicated to examining issues of power, cultural forms, and social processes. Members reject the claim of a single literacy (associated in large measure with “schooled literacy”) but rather recognize multiple literacies. Much of the research of the members analyzes the roles of literacies in the formation of identity, including the analysis of how people in their everyday practice take up/contend with official literacies. Similarly, our members engage in the study of language as situated within the contested spaces of power, across various institutional and community setitngs. A commitment to racial and social justice is an essential part of our research, collaboration, and advocacy.

#3 Anthropology of Post-Secondary Education

Co-Chair: Eli Thorkelson
University of Chicago
Eli@UChicago.edu

Co-Chair: David E. Long
George Mason University
dlong9@gmu.edu

Members of Committee 3 are dedicated to the principle that post-secondary settings and processes are worthy of investigation: theoretically, ethnographically and practically. Post-secondary education references a series of overlapping and interpenetrating such sites and activities. All variations of institutions of higher education across the world are within its purview, including but not limited to community colleges, vocational programs, seminaries, research universities, proprietary colleges, and all of the activities that take place in and around them. Questions of access, equity, knowledge production, social justice, activism, identity formation, organizational culture and structure, pedagogy, participation and citizenship in these spaces are central. As members of CAE are largely participants in these institutions and activities, Committee #3 is a powerful space for both engaged scholarship and reflection on practice.

#4 Culture Learning and Transmission

Co-Chair: Dawn Grimes-MacLellan
Earlham College
dawnm@earlham.edu

Co-Chair: Swapna Mukhopadhyay
Portland State University
swapna@pdx.edu

Committee 4 focuses on culture learning as well as culture acquisition and culture transmission in and out of school; its interest and effort are not limited to school-age populations, but also include life-long culture learning in various institutional contexts, and in societal settings within and outside the U.S.

#5 African Americans, African Diaspora and Education

Chair: Naomi Reed
University of Texas
naomireed@utexas.edu

Co-Chair: Kevin Foster
University of Texas at Austin
kmfoster@mail.utexas.edu

#6 Latin@s and Education

Co-Chair:Jorge Solís
University of Texas at San Antonio
Jorge.Solis@utsa.edu

Co-Chair: Zitlali Morales
University of Illinois, Chicago
zitlali@uic.edu

The research of Committee Six addresses the social, educational, political, and economic inequities faced by Latina/o immigrants and non-dominant English-speaking communities, as well as issues of power and language; the continued segregation of Latina/o students in schools; and the historical struggles of the Chicana/o education rights movement. We aim to honor the work, courage, and ways in which Latinas/os draw upon cultural and human resources (within their diverse settings) to withstand injustices, create change, and find success.

#7 Indigenous Education

Chair: Vanessa Anthony-Stevens
University of Arizona
vanes25@email.arizona.edu

Co-chair: Sheilah Nicholas
University of Arizona
sheilahn@email.arizona.edu

#8 Asians, Pacific Islanders, and Asian Americans in Education

Chair: Yi-Jung (Shelley) Wu
Rutgers University
yi-jung.wu@gse.rutgers.edu

This committee aims to contribute to scholarly collaboration with interdisciplinary researchers, to strengthen the theoretical and methodological aspects of APIAA studies in education, and to work toward a comprehensive understanding of APIAA’s educational experiences. The term “educational experiences” involves academic and non-academic learning within institutional contexts (including family, community, and school), understood through anthropological analysis. The Committee on APIAA in Education was founded to provide a home for scholars who are interested in exploring the complex interplay among the APIAA population, educational institutions, and socio-cultural structures in a changing global context.

#9 Gender and Sexuality in Schools and Society

Chair: Susan W. Woolley
University of California, Berkeley
susanwalkerwoolley@gmail.com

Co-Chair: Katie Elliott
University of Wisconsin-Whitewater
elliottk@uww.edu

#10 International Issues, (Im)migration, Transnationalism and Citizenship in
Educational Contexts

Co-Chair: Wai Chi Chee
Chinese University of Hong Kong
cheewaichi@gmail.com

Co-Chair: Christine Malsbary
University of Hawaii
malsbary@hawaii.edu

This committee focuses on how global flows across geopolitical and imagined borders may impact educational contexts and experiences. The committee explores the dynamic processes of migration and transnational phenomena that are shaping issues of language, identity, and citizenship in both formal and informal educational settings.

#11 Exceptionalities in Education

Chair: Juliette deWolfe
Teachers College, Columbia
jld2158@columbia.edu

Co-chair: Sylvia Mac
Oklahoma State University
sylvia.mac@okstate.edu

The mission of Committee 11 is to explore and interrogate the topics of interest including but not limited to “exceptionality,” (dis)ability, special education, special needs, “At-risk” students, and “Gift and Talented” students in spaces of formal education, such as schools, informal education (play groups, afterschool activities, families, religious education, education via media), and in home schools and community school settings. We aim to think critically and compassionately about individual and group identities and identifications, labels, categories, stigma, and “othering,” policy development and implementation, programming at global, federal, state, and local levels, professional training, an inclusive and exclusive practices.  We will do this by utilizing methodologies including, but not limited to, storytelling, policy analyses, ethnographic research, memoirs and biographies, network and system analyses, participatory action research, and digital and media-based methodologies.

#12 Privatization, Markets, and (Post-)Neoliberalism in Educational Contexts.

Chair: Bryan Brayboy
Arizona State University
Bryan.Brayboy@asu.edu

Co-Chair: Marta Baltodano
Loyola Marymount University
Marta.baltodano@lmu.edu

Committee #13  Systemic Violence in Education, Schools and Communities

Co-Chair: Rita Henderson
University of Calgary
Rita.isabel.henderson@gmail.com

Co-Chair: Sarai Koo
Chapman University and MAPS 4 College, Project SPICES
saraikoo@gmail.com

Systemic/structural violence refers to forms of harm that become normalized in processes of socialization, their root causes frequently hidden within cultural practices (within communities, schools, media, and society more broadly). We are particularly interested in developing research and intervention skills that help transform systemic violence by a) breaking cycles of self-harm, b) dismantling/confronting policies and practices that reproduce it. c) fostering healing/restoration, d) engaging youth voices in the transformative process.

Committee #14   Ethnography of Educational Policies and Systems 

Co-chair: Kathryn Hayes
University of California Davis
knhayes@ucdavis.edu

Co-Chair: Rebecca Hodges
Washington University, St. Louis
rhodges@wustl.edu

Research within this committee examines the production, translation, and implementation of educational policy in terms of discourse, power, epistemology, and cultural practice.  We are interested in exploring both policy mechanisms that frame the production of participants in educational systems as well as the spaces for individual and collective agency to negotiate, enact, resist, or redefine policy narratives.  In doing so we seek to understand the lived experience and local understandings of macro-level legislative and governance processes. Our members’ research attends to intersections of theory and practice, contingency and geographic context.

Committee #15  Adult Education

Co-Chair: Janise Hurtig
University of Illinois, Chicago
jdhurtig@gmail.com

Co-Chair: Matt Carlson
University of Minnesota
carl1207@umn.edu

The broad mission of Committee 15 is to
contribute to our cultural understanding of educational processes across
the life cycle, and to wider socio-cultural analyses of adult life. We
seek to do so by illuminating adults’ educational experiences — as
teachers and learners, — as a kind of cultural production that takes
place in formal, informal, and non-formal settings. We are committed to
studying adult education ethnographically as it takes place in a variety
of socio-historical contexts, through a multiplicity of relationships,
informed by diverse social theoretical frameworks.  In addition, many
members employ collaborative and participatory research methodologies,
which mark continuities with traditions of popular education that are
based in a political commitment to education as a humanizing, agentive
activity.