CfP: panel on vulnerability in rural U.S. communities

Law and Society Association’s 2015 Annual Meeting in Seattle / proposals are due: Oct. 15.

panel: “Claiming and Contesting Vulnerability in Rural America”

Approximately one-fifth of the U.S. population lives in rural areas. Owing
largely to the industrial restructuring of the last few decades, many of
these areas contend with persistent poverty, deteriorating infrastructure,
diminished educational opportunities, unemployment or insecure employment,
and industrial waste. Yet while marginalized by initiatives and interests
that frequently fail to consider geography, the vulnerability experienced
by rural Americans often stems from more complex interactions between, and
within, rural and *other* positionalities.

This session explores the ways rural community members uniquely experience,
or are assumed to experience, vulnerability on the basis of age, class,
citizenship, gender and/or race. Specifically, panelists consider the
interplay of identity and vulnerability in the legal realm. How is
vulnerability defined? When does it matter? When are vulnerability claims
assumed, invoked, denied or resisted?and by whom? In recognizing that
multiple understandings of place, positionality and rights converge on the
contested concept of ?vulnerability,? this panel enhances interdisciplinary
work on legal advocacy, access to justice, and rural America.

If you have any interest in joining us or questions about how/whether your
work might fit, please email statzm@u.washington.edu

SLACA: 2014 Whiteford Graduate Student Award in Applied and Public Anthropology

The Society for Latin American and Caribbean Anthropology (SLACA) announces its 2014 Whiteford Graduate Student Award in Applied and Public
Anthropology in honor of Michael B. Whiteford and Scott Whiteford. The
award is intended to help a graduate student attend the SLACA Spring
bi-annual meeting. The 2015 meeting will be held in Oaxaca Mexico, March 26-28. The prize consists of US $1000 to support a student registered in a graduate program in Latin American, the Caribbean or the United States. We encourage anthropology departments to support students entering the
competition by providing additional conference travel funds.
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38th Annual Appalachian Studies Conference: Many Mountains, Many Musics

March 27-29, 2015
East Tennessee State University, Johnson City, Tennessee

Deadline: Conference proposals may be submitted between September 1 and October 17, 2014.

The 2015 ASA Conference will be held at East Tennessee State University in Johnson City, Tennessee, a public university of approximately 15,000 students. The conference will take place at two primary locations on the ETSU campus. The D. P. Culp University Center will serve as the central hospitality location, where registration, silent auction, exhibits, breaks, the Many Mountains Plenary, and the Many Musics Concert will take place. The Culp Center also houses dining facilities and a Starbucks. Concurrent sessions will take place in Rogers-Stout Hall, which is fully equipped with smart classrooms. Click here for maps and directions.

The theme of this year’s conference ― MANY MOUNTAINS, MANY MUSICS ― challenges you to view Appalachia from a fresh perspective and discover its emergence as a creative, dynamic force. U.S. Senator Lamar Alexander, the invited KEYNOTE speaker, will provide special insight into Appalachia in the 21st Century. Senator Alexander, who was instrumental in establishing ETSU’s Center of Excellence in Appalachian Studies and Services, has committed a lifetime of public service to advancing the lives of the people of Appalachia. In keeping with the theme, the MANY MOUNTAINS PLENARY will bring together a noteworthy panel to discuss “Opportunity & Enterprise in Appalachia.” Also scheduled is a MANY MOUNTAINS SERVICE PROJECT along with group tours that include the new Birthplace of Country Music Museum. Continue reading

CfP: Affective Ecologies, Living Economies and Alternate Ways of Valuing Nature at AAG 2015

Chicago, 21-25 April 2015
Organizers: Neera Singh, University of Toronto (neera.singh@utoronto.ca);
Katja Neves-Graca, Concordia University (katja.neves@concordia.ca);
Mamta Vardhan, University of Alberta (vardhan@ualberta.ca)

Commodification of nature and market-based approaches to conservation have
emerged as the dominant strategies to address environmental degradation and
incentivize conservation-oriented behavior. While geographers have
critiqued commodification of nature extensively, they have paid less
attention to alternative ways of valuing nature (as practiced in many
societies based on other-than economic utility rationale) and to rethinking
frameworks that enable commodification of nature (such as the discourse of
ecosystem services and tools for monetizing nature) (Jackson and Palmer,
2014).  In this session, we ask how valuing affective and communicative
relations between humans and non-humans, can lead to a different conception
of nature (respectful of affect-laden and vibrant socio-nature
entanglements) than the now hegemonic ecosystem-services discourse-based
view of nature.  We thus invite attention to diverse ways of valuing life,
our ability to respond to it and pathways to “becoming green” that are
ethical and socially just. The overarching goal of the session will be to
offer alternatives to market-based approaches to conservation based on
principles of cooperation, reciprocity and plentitude.
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Recent Highlights from The Journal of Peasant Studies

Routledge are pleased to announce that The Journal of Peasant Studies
received an Impact Factor of 5.477 in the 2014 Journal Citation Reports.
The journal is a leading title in its field ranking once again, first place
in the Planning and Development and Anthropology categories.

In celebration of this great achievement, we are offering free access to
recent highlights from issues published in 2013 and 2014. These articles are free to access until the end of 2014. Click here to see the collection and start reading.

CfP: Dimensions of Political Ecology (DOPE) Conference

University of Kentucky | Lexington, Kentucky, USA
February 26 – February 28, 2015
www.politicalecology.org

Keynote Address: Dr. Kimberly Tallbear (Anthropology, University of Texas)

Plenary Panel: Dr. Irus Braverman (Law & Geography, University of Buffalo), Dr. Jake Kosek (Geography, University of California, Berkeley) & Dr. Shiloh Krupar (Culture & Politics Program, Georgetown University). Other conference events include: Paper sessions, Workshops, Round-table discussions, Panels, Undergraduate research symposium, Paper competitions and Field trips.
Online conference registration will open Monday, October 6, 2014 and close
on Monday, November 17, 2014. The conference registration fee is $35 for
graduate students and $70 for faculty and non-academics/practitioners.
There is no fee for undergraduate participants.

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Dartmouth Society of Fellows

Dartmouth is starting a new initiative — the Dartmouth Society of Fellows — to bring smart, energetic postdocs to campus.  (It’s meant to be like the Michigan or Harvard Society of Fellows.)  It’s a very generous, 3-year postdoc in which those appointed are asked to teach for one 9.5 week quarter per year, with the rest of the time dedicated to research and writing.  Fellows will hold appointments in the department of their home discipline as well as in the Society of Fellows and applicants can be in any field.  The application deadline is October 15.  

C&A cosponsoring SfAAs

Culture & Agriculture is cosponsoring the Annual Meetings of the Society for Applied Anthropology.  The SfAAs will be held in Pittsburgh, March 24-28, 2015.   http://www.sfaa.net/annual-meeting/pittsburgh-2015/

We warmly invite submissions of paper, poster, and session proposals dealing with, among other themes, agricultural, forestry, fisheries, aquaculture, water, and food-systems.  On the submission page, you may indicate that you would like C&A Program to review your abstract.  C&A members who are not SfAA members may register for the conference at member rates. Official deadline for submissions: October 15. (We will also be arranging some terrific food/farm tours in the Pittsburgh area.)

Teaching Fieldwork: C&A’s Notes from the Field 2014 in Anthropology News

Liz Olson and Mary Beth Schmid wrote up a short piece on how our C&A collaborative blog project, Notes from the Field 2014,  can be used in the classroom to help teach about fieldwork. It was posted in Anthropology News online and you can find the piece at: http://www.anthropology-news.org/index.php/2014/09/05/using-notes-from-the-field/
Thanks again to all the participants!

Seeking farmers to interview

Note from Melinda Hemmelgarn:

I’m writing an article for ACRES USA on drift and am interested in speaking to farmers who have suffered crop damage, financial loss, or harm to personal health due to pesticide drift. I’m curious to know how different states handle farmers’ losses, what kind of compensation exists, and thoughts on new 2,4-D and dicamba-resistant crops which appear to be coming soon to fields near us.
Please email me foodsleuth@gmail.com if you’d like to share your experience and offer suggestions for advocacy. Thank you.